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Andrea Mitchell to Pence: ‘You Broke Precedent’ Attacking Dems to the Troops

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Tuesday on MSNBC, NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell interviewed Vice President Mike Pence in Jerusalem and questioned him about getting political on a military base.

Partial transcript as follows:

MITCHELL: On this trip, you, in front of Israeli television and standing next to a foreign leader, slammed Senator Schumer by name for the shutdown. Was that appropriate?

PENCE: Well the reailty is that this was as an unnecessary government shutdown and the American people know it. Fortunately, President Trump stood firm, Republicans in the House and Senate stood firm and 81 members of the Senate came together to reopen the government and allow us to begin to move forward with the priorities this country really should be dealing with. First and foremost, a long-term spending bill will allow us to increase funding on our military at a level that we haven’t been able to do so for many, many years, fund critical domestic priorities and now, we are also going to be able to move on to the issue of DACA, the issue of a border wall, the issue of immigration reform. But it was important for us to set the record straight. The Schumer shutdown failed. The American people know it and I thought it was the right time for me to make that—

MITCHELL: You don’t think you were being too political when you broke precedent and on a military base overseas, forward base, you told the troops that it was the Democratic minority responsible for the shutdown?

PENCE: I said there was a minority in the Senate. But Andrea, I was standing in front of Americans in uniform. Americans who every hour of the day are taking off and flying sorties in the fight against ISIS, and they were people who were facing a question of whether they were going to be paid, whether they and their families were going to get the benefits they earn. I wanted them to know President Trump and I were standing with them, fighting for them and we were going to get the government reopened and we were going to stand with them every step of the way.

MITCHELL: Correct, you did say the minority in the Senate to them and clearly you were talking about the Democrats. It was a political statement. You have been criticized for that.

PENCE: I just thought it was important. Here are Americans in uniform on a far distant battlefield defeating the ISIS enemy in record time. It’s extraordinary to think of the progress we have made against ISIS in the last year—98% of the territory that ISIS had taken down over the last year, by exactly those soldiers I was standing amongst. I wanted them to know that whatever was happening in Washington, D.C., the commander in chief had their back and we were going to make sure this government reopened, they and their families got the benefits they deserve and we welcome the bipartisan effort in the Senate, the strong support in the House to do just that.

Follow Pam Key on Twitter @pamkeyNEN

Schumer: Dems Came to the View That ‘People Don’t Want the Government Shut Down for’ DREAMers

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byIan Hanchett23 Jan 20180

On Tuesday’s broadcast of MSNBC’s “Rachel Maddow Show,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) stated that the Democrats in the Senate “came to the view that” if the government shutdown continued, the country would lose support for the shutdown and for the DREAMers because people “don’t want to the government shut down for” DREAMers.

Schumer said Democrats “advanced the cause.”

He continued that Democrats don’t control the levers of power and have to be strategic in how they push for DACA protection.

He added that while President Trump shut the government down, “all of us in the Democratic caucus, not just the moderates, but the liberals as well, came to the view that if we carried it on much longer, two things would happen: A. No one would budge. The public would lose support of the shutdown. The public does not like shutdowns. And we’d actually lose support for DREAMers, too. Because people love the DREAMers, but don’t want the government shut down for it. So, we cut the best deal that we could.”

Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett

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Breitbart TV, Chuck Schumer, DACA, Dreamers, government shutdown

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FNC’s Baier: Opinion Side of Fox News Has No Problem Getting Interviews with Trump, But the News Side Is a Different Story

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byIan Hanchett23 Jan 20180

During a discussion with the Washington Post on Tuesday, Fox News Channel anchor Bret Baier stated that while FNC’s “opinion side” has had no problems getting interviews with the president, the news side has had problems getting interviews with the president.

Baier said [relevant remarks begin around 15:00] that the news side of FNC is in the same position as all the other networks in trying to get interviews with the president. He added, “The opinion side of Fox News does not have a problem getting interviews. But my request, Chris Wallace’s request for an interview with the president has not been answered. And I last interviewed candidate Trump almost 500 days ago, and have asked every week since, for an interview, sometimes twice a week, and have — you know, I’ve seen him off the record a couple of times at engagements, and he said, ‘It’s going to happen very soon.'”

(h/t Mediaite)

Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett

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Breitbart TV, Bret Baier, Chris Wallace, Fox News Channel

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Press release: PM commits to government-wide drive to tackle loneliness

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Today (Wednesday 17 January) the Prime Minister will set out how government is tackling loneliness and combating social isolation.

She will announce that the government is accepting a series of recommendations from the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness.

The Prime Minister will host a reception at Downing Street to celebrate Jo Cox’s legacy, and the important work of her family, Foundation and the Commission in highlighting how many people are experiencing loneliness.

Research shows:

  • more than 9 million people always or often feel lonely
  • around 200,000 older people have not had a conversation with a friend or relative in more than a month
  • up to 85% of young disabled adults – 18-34 year olds – feel lonely

Ahead of the reception, the Prime Minister paid tribute to Jo Cox, her family and to those working for the Foundation and Commission for highlighting the issue.

The Prime Minister said:

For far too many people, loneliness is the sad reality of modern life.

I want to confront this challenge for our society and for all of us to take action to address the loneliness endured by the elderly, by carers, by those who have lost loved ones – people who have no one to talk to or share their thoughts and experiences with.

Jo Cox recognised the scale of loneliness across the country and dedicated herself to doing all she could to help those affected.

So I am pleased that government can build on her legacy with a ministerial lead for loneliness who will work with the Commission, businesses and charities to shine a light on the issue and pull together all strands of government to create the first ever strategy.

Speech: PM speech at V&A reception: 18 January 2018

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I am delighted to welcome you to the world-famous V&A this evening – a jewel in the crown of Britain’s culture. And now, like so much of Britain, further enriched by a French contribution – with Alice Dietsch as Project Director for the development of the stunning Exhibition Road Quarter which opened last Summer. And I am very pleased that Alice joins us here this evening, together with British architect Amanda Levete, whose practice delivered the whole project.

This evening marks the culmination of the 35th Franco-British Summit.

Traditionally this Summit has focused on our security and defence partnership. And it is right that today we have deepened that partnership further.

And of course we meet in the year that marks a century since the end of the First World War, when our troops fought side-by-side in defence of our shared belief in freedom and resistance against aggression.

And today we stand together against new threats to that same shared belief in freedom. And as I said in my very first speech as Prime Minister in the British Parliament – in the aftermath of the appalling terrorist attack in Nice – “the values of liberté, égalité and fraternité will prevail.”

But tonight is about even more than the defence of our shared values. It is about celebrating those values and the extraordinary depth of the people to people links between our countries.

Here in this Gallery tonight we have partners in business that make up just some of the £71 billion of trade between our countries every year.

Partners in science – from joint space programmes to joint working on genomics in the fight against cancer.

Partners in culture – for example, with your wonderful offer to bring the Bayeux Tapestry to our shores. The first time in almost a thousand years that people right here in Britain will have the opportunity to see a piece of French art that is so important to both our national stories.

Partners in sport – sharing ideas and expertise about major sporting events ahead of the 2023 Rugby World Cup and the 2024 Paris Olympics.

News story: UK to step up French operations in Africa as PM and President Macron meet for UK-France Summit

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The Prime Minister is expected to make the announcement as part of the UK-France Summit at The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, where she will discuss the UK’s strong and wide-ranging bilateral relationship with President Macron.

The helicopters, which will provide logistic support to French troops, are part of a wider effort to increase stability in the Sahel region of Africa in order to tackle Islamist terrorism.

UK and French efforts in the region aim to provide greater stability, reducing the global terrorist threat and stemming the flow of illegal migration to Europe.

The UK has been a long-standing supporter of UN, EU and African Union military operations in Mali and has worked with international partners to prevent extremists from using the ungoverned space in the Sahel to plan and launch attacks on Europe, as well as counter the illegal trade in people, drugs, weapons and wildlife.

This is in addition to existing wider support to Africa including doubling our UN peacekeeping contribution with additional deployments to South Sudan and Somalia. Today the UK and France also agreed to work together to ensure EU African Peace Facility funding for AMISOM in Somalia.

The deployment of Chinooks to Mali will increase British support to France’s Operation BARKHANE, in addition to strategic air transport flights already being carried out by the RAF.

British military personnel will not be involved in combat operations, but the deployment of Chinooks will provide a niche capability providing logistical support but also saving lives by avoiding the need to move troops by ground where they are more vulnerable to attack.

Alongside the military contribution, DfID will allocate £50m of additional aid including lifesaving humanitarian support for hundreds of thousands of people affected by epidemics, natural disasters and conflict across Mali, Niger, Chad, North Cameroon, Burkina Faso and Mauritania.

This will provide 320,000 people with emergency food and nutrition support and provide protection for 255,000 internally displaced people, returnees, refugees and their host communities. It will also supply clean water and better sanitation for 150,000 people.

The FCO is also exploring ways to better support the UK national interest in the region by enhancing the UK diplomatic presence.

Hundreds of cases dropped over evidence disclosure failings

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The number of prosecutions in England and Wales that collapsed because of a failure by police or prosecutors to disclose evidence increased by 70% in the last two years, the BBC can reveal.

Last year, 916 people had charges dropped over a failure to disclose evidence – up from 537 in 2014-15.

It comes after recent collapsed rape cases highlighted a failure to share evidence with defence solicitors.

The Crown Prosecution Service said the justice system had "systemic" problems.

In the lead up to criminal trials, police and prosecutors have a duty to disclose evidence that might either assist the defence case or undermine the prosecution's.

However, the recent collapse of several rape cases has heightened concerns that evidence is not being disclosed early enough, and that the rules are not being followed.

'A daily struggle'

In December, the trial of Isaac Itiary, who was accused of raping a child, collapsed when new evidence came to light.

During Mr Itiary's trial, police failed to disclose messages which showed the girl, then 16 years old, had told the defendant she was 19.

The same month, the trial of Liam Allan, who faced 12 counts of rape and sexual assault, was also halted.

The case against Mr Allan was dropped when it emerged evidence on a computer disc – which police had looked through – showed messages from the alleged victim pestering him for "casual sex".

Newspapers threaten legal action for Worboys parole report

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Two newspapers have threatened legal action if the Parole Board does not publish its reasons for agreeing to release convicted rapist John Worboys.

The Sun and the Daily Mail have written to the board and Justice Secretary David Gauke demanding the report.

If they do not release it within seven days, the papers have said they will apply for a judicial review.

Both the board and Ministry of Justice said they are legally prohibited from disclosing Parole Board decisions.

Former black-cab driver Worboys, 60, was jailed for a minimum term of eight years in 2009 for drugging and sexually assaulting women passengers.

After a hearing about his case in November, the Parole Board decided to approve his release with "stringent" licence conditions.

The decision was met with a furore by Worboys' victims and in Parliament.

On Tuesday Scotland Yard confirmed it is investigating a new allegation of sexual assault made against him this month – though dating back to 1997 – which could delay his release date if it leads to criminal charges.

No arrests have been made.

Worboys was transferred from high-security prison HMP Wakefield in West Yorkshire to HMP Belmarsh in south-east London at the weekend – prompting fresh outrage that he may be allowed to return to the capital.

Newspapers threaten legal action for Worboys parole report

0

Two newspapers have threatened legal action if the Parole Board does not publish its reasons for agreeing to release convicted rapist John Worboys.

The Sun and the Daily Mail have written to the board and Justice Secretary David Gauke demanding the report.

If they do not release it within seven days, the papers have said they will apply for a judicial review.

Both the board and Ministry of Justice said they are legally prohibited from disclosing Parole Board decisions.

Former black-cab driver Worboys, 60, was jailed for a minimum term of eight years in 2009 for drugging and sexually assaulting women passengers.

After a hearing about his case in November, the Parole Board decided to approve his release with "stringent" licence conditions.

The decision was met with a furore by Worboys' victims and in Parliament.

On Tuesday Scotland Yard confirmed it is investigating a new allegation of sexual assault made against him this month – though dating back to 1997 – which could delay his release date if it leads to criminal charges.

No arrests have been made.

Worboys was transferred from high-security prison HMP Wakefield in West Yorkshire to HMP Belmarsh in south-east London at the weekend – prompting fresh outrage that he may be allowed to return to the capital.

Deaf mum sues Little Mix promoter in sign language row

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Eight-year-old Cate Merry and her friend Megan are big fans of Little Mix.

They've got the T-shirts, the photo albums, the CDs, can sing the songs and rock the dance routines.

So how did their love of the band lead to unprecedented legal action?

Last year, Cate's mum Sally Reynolds bought six tickets to see the band in concert on 1 September at the South of England Event Centre in Sussex.

Sally is deaf and booked for herself and two deaf friends to go with their daughters who are all able to hear.

In order that she and her two friends could fully access the performance, Sally asked the organisers, LHG Live, to provide a British Sign Language interpreter.

She was initially offered carer tickets and told that she could bring her own interpreter, but she didn't consider that met her needs or amounted to full access.

Speaking exclusively to the BBC, Sally explained: "We asked two or three times, please can you provide the interpreter for us, and the explanation we got back was just a 'no'.

"It didn't have any reason behind it and eventually we became so frustrated.

"I wanted to share the same experience my daughter had – essentially I just wanted access to the songs."